Leisure communities of practice

Using leisure as knowledgebuilding

A practice is defined (Shove) as  ‘a process of integration resulting in a structured arrangement’. It results in a practice that exists for a while as a recognisable entity (Richards; Shove)

Within leisure and community of practice, all the basic elements are present to facilitate learning-environments. However inherent to the structure of international citytour companies and the way they function, also gives little affordance to co-learn, collaborative teaching and flow of knowledge through actual practice. The quality of staff is not always high enough to do it, although all the ingredients for successful knowledgebuilding are present.

Quote Greg Richards:

Most leisure practices also involve the development of particular skills, competences or knowledge. When we play sport we increase our level of skill, and this increases our desire to participate (what Scitovsky (1976) has termed ‘skilled consumption’).

Ofcourse, most activities in travel and leisure have a more or less fixed timescale and are modular. In travel, people share a space and place and move on, either into their ordinary lives or the next travel location.

Let guides learn from eachother, from experience, co-production and co-creation, and let them pass the knowledge on to eachother.

Knowledge creation takes place through practical interaction and informal learning, making it accessable to new and even temporary tourguides and several stronger local leadership-roles. They create “communities of practice.”